Read Highwaypersons, then think about these questions.

Why the questions?

You might be among that happy band who have enjoyed Highwaypersons, Book I or Book II, for the stories, the characters and the writing. (Come on! There must be some of you out there.) If so, I hope you will enjoy Book III when it comes out. You might not want to think about any questions. You might, however, be among the people who find the historical setting interesting. I hope you also like the other aspects of the books, but for you I am suggesting a few questions to consider. You might even discuss them in a readers group or history society group, or just with a mate over a pint.

A stack of copies of Highwaypersons, Book I, about which I am asking questions
A stack of copies of Highwaypersons, Book I, about which I am asking questions
These are not quiz questions

There are no right answers, but there are wrong answers. Considering the issues could help you get more understanding of the period and perhaps a better appreciation of the novels. This week let’s think about the Jacobites, in Book I, Debts and Duties.

Questions about the Jacobites.
  1. Why do you think they waited until after the War of the Spanish Succession was over to start their rebellion in 1715?
  2. Would the French or Spanish have helped them if they had rebelled during the War?
  3. Why did they get no help from abroad when they did rebel?
  4. Did the rebels ever have a chance? What went wrong?
  5. Should James Stewart have changed his religion, at least outwardly, and accepted negotiated terms with the British Government, before Queen Anne died?
  6. Who would have been better off if James Stewart, the Pretender, had succeeded and become king? The Scots? The Welsh? The Irish? Anyone?
  7. Why did some Protestants, such as Lewis Pryce and the Duke of Ormonde, support the Jacobites?
  8. I have put answers to some of these questions into the mouths of some of the characters in the novels, but do you agree with them?
More questions coming soon

I want us to think about other historical issues mentioned in the books.

If you haven’t read them yet, here’s where to get the two volumes.

Book I, Debts and Duties   

click here for  Kindle

Book II, paper and Kindle, The King’s Justice

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