What credible character?

Does my next book lack a credible character? I am in the process of writing a novel set at the outset of the English Civil War in 1642. My hero is the son of a nobleman, studying at Oxford. He wants to keep out of political and religious controversies and is horrified as events take over, forcing him eventually to take sides. You may find similarities to my hero in Highwaypersons book I or book 2  but I hope you will find some important differences. I tried to make the book credible and reasonably true to history, as I explained previously.

Highwaypersons: Debts and Duties - The hero of this book is a credible character. What of the next?

Highwaypersons: Debts and Duties – The hero of this book is a credible character. What of the next?

Highwaypersons, Book II: The King's Justice, has the same credible character as its hero. Will the next book?

Highwaypersons, Book II: The King’s Justice, has the same main character as its hero.

Who says he’s not a credible character?

Some say he’s too naive, because surely he could see how things were developing. If they are right, the novel’s a non-starter, as the whole point is to show one man’s inner conflict alongside the conflicts going on around him. Am I on a hiding to nothing? Or is there an interesting story here? What could I do to make him credible without abandoning my basic premise?

Remember the motto of Monmouth: Utrique Fidelis, meaning Loyal to Both.

Monmouth's arms.

The arms of Monmouth

What do you regard as a credible character?

Please let me have your thoughts, as comments on this blog, via the contact form on the website or by e-mail to geoffrey@geoffreymonmouth.co.uk

Whichever view you take, it will be helpful for me to know how you think.